Podiatrist - Big Rapids
115 Linden Street
Big Rapids, MI 49307
231-796-4522

 

Your first visit to Big Rapids Foot & Ankle, PC establishes a vital foundation for our relationship with you. During the first visit, we make sure to obtain important background information, like your medical history, and give you time to get to know your doctor. To understand what to expect for your first visit to our practice, please read through this page. You’ll find all the practical information you need, such as a map and directions to our office, practice hours, payment policies and more. There’s also background information about our committed staff and our first visit procedures. You can even save some time at your first visit by registering online in advance of your appointment.

Mission Statement
Quality Foot and Ankle care for the entire family.

Patient Forms

Contact our office at 231-796-4522 to obtain information via email to register online before your first visit.  


Patient Portal

Patients can use an online portal titled OnPatient.  Patients will receive a link in their email to register for onpatient and then complete information prior to their appointment.  This portal is also a great way to communicate with staff, cancel appointments, and retrieve important medical information.


When to call a Doctor

  • You have persistent pain in your feet or ankles.
  • You have noticeable change to your nails or skin.
  • Your feet are severely cracking, scaling, or peeling.
  • There are blisters on your feet.
  • There are signs of bacterial infection, including:
    • Increased pain, swelling, redness, tenderness, or heat.
    • Red streaks extending from the affected area.
    • Discharge of pus.
    • Fever of 100°F (37.78°C) or higher with no other cause.
    • Symptoms that do not improve after two weeks of treatment with a non-prescription product.
    • Spreading of the infection to other areas, such as the nail bed, or skin under the nail, the nail itself, or the surrounding skin.
  • Your toenail is getting thicker and causing you discomfort.
  • You have heel pain accompanied by a fever, redness (sometimes warmth) or numbness or tingling in your heel, or persistent pain without putting any weight or pressure on your heel, or the pain is not alleviated by ice, aspirin, (or ibuprofen or acetaminophen).
  • You have diabetes or certain diseases associated with poor circulation and you develop athlete`s foot. People with diabetes are at increased risk for a severe bacterial infection of the foot and leg if they have athlete's foot.



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